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Delaware Counseling License Requirements

The Mid-Atlantic state of Delaware has been seeing considerable growth in population. The US Census Bureau reports that the population of Delaware has grown by 7.7% between 2010 and 2018, increasing its residents to over 967,000.1 Though it is a smaller state in size, Delaware’s increasing population is keeping the estimated 2,510 people currently working in counseling occupations busy.2-6 If you think Delaware is the right place to begin a career as a counselor, you will need to understand the process to become one including the licensing regulations and the various steps to licensure. On this page, you will learn the process for becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor of Mental Health (LPCMH) in Delaware as well as other counseling licenses.

Table of Contents
How to Become a Counselor in Delaware
Licensed Professional Counselor of Mental Health (LPCMH) Licensing Process
Additional Counseling Careers and Licenses in Delaware
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)
School Counselor
Licensed Chemical Dependency Professional (LCDP)
Other Professional Counseling Careers
Delaware Counseling Career and Salary Information
Counseling Associations in Delaware
Frequently Asked Questions

How to Become a Counselor in Delaware

In Delaware, most types of professional counselors must have a master’s degree that meets coursework requirements for the practice area pursued. Several schools in Delaware offer counseling programs that meet this requirement; prospective counselors may also find that degrees from schools in other states meet Delaware’s requirements as well. There will also be many other steps to complete, such as accumulating work experience, before you are eligible for full licensure.

1. Pick an area of counseling specialization to pursue.

To become a professional counselor, you must choose an area of specialization and research the steps to licensure because each type has different education, work experience, and testing requirements. Knowing these steps before you begin your journey to becoming a counselor will save you valuable time in the licensure process.

2. Complete the education required for your counseling practice area.

Most counseling licenses require a master’s degree with related coursework. Mental health counselors must have a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling or a related field; marriage and family therapists must have a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy or a related field; and chemical dependency professionals must have a master’s degree with 30 credits in counseling-related areas. School counselors must have a master’s degree with coursework specifically in school counseling.

3. Apply for a license to practice counseling in Delaware.

You can apply for your counseling license once you have completed all the required steps. The Delaware Board of Mental Health and Chemical Dependency Professionals issues licenses for many of the major types of counseling, including professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, and chemical dependency professionals. The Delaware Department of Education is responsible for school counseling credentials. Continue reading this guide to learn more about counseling licensure in Delaware.

Licensed Professional Counselor of Mental Health (LPCMH) Licensing Process

The Delaware Board of Mental Health and Chemical Dependency Professionals issues licenses for mental health counselors. Delaware clinical counselors use clinical counseling techniques to diagnose and treat mental and emotional disorders and improve personal and social development. If you would like to know more about what professional counselors do, see our mental health counselor career guide. Prospective counselors must have a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling or a related field; if the degree has fewer than 60 credits or is not in clinical mental health counseling, the applicant must complete a coursework sheet and submit course descriptions.

1. Pass the required exam.

The Board requires applicants to pass either the National Counselor Examination (NCE) or the National Clinical Mental Health Counselor Exam (NCMHCE) administered by the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC). While the NCE tests for foundational counseling knowledge, the NCMHCE focuses on clinical mental health diagnosis and treatment. Refer to the NCE and
NCMHCE handbooks for more information about these computer-based exams.

2. Register as a Licensed Associate Counselor of Mental Health (LACMH).

After passing the exam, you can submit an application for an associate license to the Board. The application package is available online. As part of the application, you must complete a supervision plan in collaboration with your proposed supervisor that documents how you will meet supervised experience requirements. You must also have your fingerprints taken for state and federal criminal background checks at an approved facility. Once approved, associate licenses expire two years from the date of issue and can be renewed twice. As of October 2019, the application fee is $236.

3. Accrue supervised experience.

Associates must complete at least 3,200 hours of work experience in no less than two years and no more than four years, including at least 1,600 hours of supervised clinical experience. A maximum of 30 post-master’s credits can be used towards 1,600 of the required hours. At least 100 hours of supervision must be provided face-to-face by an LPCMH or a pre-approved clinical mental health professional with two years of post-licensure experience and no disciplinary actions. The Board provides further information about supervision requirements online.

4. Apply to become a Licensed Professional Counselor of Mental Health (LPCMH).

After completing the work experience requirements, you are eligible for full licensure. A notarized application form must be submitted to the Board along with the fee to upgrade ($55 as of October 2019). Once you receive your license, you can use the professional title of LPCMH.

Professional Counselor Licensure by Reciprocity in Delaware

Delaware does not have formal reciprocity agreements for counseling licensure but the Board may grant a license to an applicant who is licensed in a state with substantially similar requirements. Licensure by reciprocity applicants must submit the application form, transcripts, exam results, and verification of all licenses held in other states including statues and rules of the licensure standards if the license has been active for less than five years. The licensure by reciprocity application fee is $236 as of October 2019.

Counselor Licensing Renewal and Continuing Education Information

Licenses expire on September 30 of even-numbered years. The Board sends renewal notices via email. Licensees must complete 40 hours of continuing education (CE) during each renewal period. CE that is not completed through a recognized national mental health organization or related to the licensee’s area of professional practice should be pre-approved by submitting the request for approval.

Additional Counseling Careers and Licenses in Delaware

The steps to becoming a professional counselor in Delaware will vary depending on your area of specialization. In addition to mental health counseling, the other major licensed counseling professionals in Delaware are: licensed marriage and family therapists, school counselors, and chemical dependency professionals.

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)

Marriage and family therapists are licensed by the Board of Mental Health and Chemical Dependency Professionals. Prospective counselors must have a 45-credit master’s degree in marriage and family therapy or a related field with significant coursework in marriage and family therapy. In Delaware, LMFTs provide psychotherapy and counseling services, assess and refer clients, and develop treatment plans related to mental and emotional disorders in the context of interpersonal relationships, such as marital and family systems. The steps to becoming licensed as a marriage and family therapist are:

  • Pass the AMFTRB national exam.
  • Register as a Licensed Associate Marriage and Family Therapist (LAMFT).
  • Earn supervised experience.
  • Request and receive your LMFT license.

Read more about LMFT careers on our LMFT career guide.

School Counselor

If you are interested in becoming a school counselor in Delaware, you will need to apply through the Delaware Department of Education. School counselors in the state plan comprehensive, outcome-focused, data-driven school counseling programs based on the national model from the ASCA. As certified educators, prospective counselors need to have a minimum of an NCATE or CAEP approved or state-approved master’s degree in school counseling. Those who have regionally accredited master’s degrees in other content areas must have completed 39 credits of school counseling coursework to be considered for the endorsement. Once you have met the educational requirements, you will:

  • Complete supervised experience.
  • Pass the Praxis school counselor examination.
  • Submit verification of clinical experience and receive your endorsement.

To learn more about school counseling, see our school counseling career guide.

Licensed Chemical Dependency Professional (LCDP)

The highest level of addictions counseling licensure in Delaware is the Licensed Chemical Dependency Professional (LCDP) license issued by the Board of Mental Health and Chemical Dependency Professionals. A master’s degree with at least 30 credits in counseling related areas is required. LCDPs provide clinical addictions counseling services to individuals and groups to help clients understand alcohol and drug abuse problems, create treatment goals and plans, and address additional social and emotional needs related to addiction problems. To earn an LCDP license in Delaware, there are a vareity of possible pathways you can take. In general, you should:

  • Register as a NAADAC National Certified Addiction Counselor or Master Addiction Counselor or a DCB Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor.
  • Submit fingerprints for state and federal background checks.
  • Earn supervised experience.
  • Request and receive your LCDP license.

Other Substance Abuse Counseling Credentials Offered in Delaware

  • Certified Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CAADC)
  • Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC)
  • Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS)
  • Certified Peer Recovery Specialist (CPRS)
  • Certified Prevention Specialist (CPS)
  • Certified Supervisor of Peer Specialists (CSPS)

More information about careers in substance abuse counseling can be found on our substance abuse counselor career guide.

Other Professional Counseling Careers

Professional counseling is a broad field that encompasses many different specialties. In addition to the major types of counseling outlined above, you may find employment in the following areas:

  • Rehabilitation Counselor
  • Gambling Counselor
  • Genetic Counselor
  • Youth Counselor
  • Guidance Counselor
  • Pastoral Counselor
  • Recreational Therapist

Delaware Counseling Career and Salary Information

The field of educational, guidance, school, and vocational counseling employs the majority of counselors working in Delaware. This is also the highest-paying counseling area in Delaware with an average annual salary of $63,990 for the 1,040 counselors working in the field, which is about 6% above the national average.4 Though it only employs 220 counselors, the practice area of marriage and family therapy reports Delaware’s second-highest average salary in counseling of $51,540.3

Several major practice areas in counseling are expected to add new positions over the coming years to support Delaware’s population growth. According to Projections Central, the counseling field estimated to add the highest number of future positions is mental health counseling, projected to add 140 jobs through 2026 for a 21.5% increase.7 Two other practice areas that are projected to add a relatively high number of jobs are educational, guidance, school, and vocational counseling and rehabilitation counseling. Both of these fields are projected to add 100 new positions by 2026.7

OccupationNumber EmployedAverage Annual Salary
Counselors, All Other90
Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors1,040$63,990
Marriage and Family Therapists220$51,540
Rehabilitation Counselors420$34,820
Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors740$44,660

Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.2-6

Counseling Associations in Delaware

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the work experience requirements for counseling licensure?

Prospective counselors must complete 3,200 hours of work experience in two to four years. Of these hours, 1,600 must be completed under approved supervision and 1,500 must be face-to-face mental health counseling services. At least 750 hours must be individual counseling sessions; the remaining hours can be provided in individual or group settings. The supervisees must receive 100 hours of direct supervision during this time. Hours completed without a pre-approved supervisor will only be counted towards the 1,600 hours of work experience that are not required to be supervised.

Can Delaware professional counselors provide telehealth services?

Mental health counseling, chemical dependency counseling, and marriage and family therapy services provided by communication technology, such as videoconferencing, are considered telehealth services. The Board allows licensed counselors to deliver telehealth services within the state of Delaware provided the counselor is knowledgeable about evidence-based telehealth techniques. Counselors must also conduct a risk-benefit analysis for each case to determine if telehealth methods are appropriate and retain this analysis in the client’s file.

What are the continuing education (CE) requirements in Delaware?

The Board requires counselors to complete 40 hours of CE during each renewal period. CE hours offered by mental health organizations such as the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) and American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) or activities specifically related to professional competence do not require preapproval from the Board. Other activities should be pre-approved by the Board as approval cannot be guaranteed afterward. Licensees should keep supporting documents, such as course syllabi, to demonstrate the course content. Teaching courses, presenting papers, or writing a journal article may account for up to 20 CE hours during each renewal period.

Who can provide counseling supervision in Delaware?

Professional counselors must be supervised by an LPCMH or a pre-approved clinical mental health professional, such as a clinical social worker, a clinical psychologist, a psychiatrist, an LMFT, or an advanced practice registered nurse. If the supervisor is not licensed in Delaware, they must demonstrate to the Board that they are qualified to provide clinical supervision.
Supervisors must have at least two years of post-licensure experience with no disciplinary actions and at least three hours of training in clinical supervision within the past two years or twelve hours of training in total. Supervisors must only supervise a maximum of 10 supervisees at once.

How many annual openings are there for counseling careers in Delaware?

The average openings for Delaware counseling positions vary depending on the area of specialization. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors have the highest number of average annual openings (120) through 2026.6 Mental health counselors and rehabilitation counselors are both projected to have 90 openings per year.6 Marriage and family therapists and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors are expected to have fewer annual openings at 30 on average during the same time period.6

References:
1. US Census Bureau, Quick Facts, Delaware: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/DE
2. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211018.htm
3. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Marriage and Family Therapists: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211013.htm
4. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211012.htm
5. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Rehabilitation Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211015.htm
6. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Counselors, All Other: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211019.htm
7. Projections Central, Long Term Occupational Projections 2016-2026: https://projectionscentral.com/Projections/LongTerm