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New Jersey Counseling License Requirements

Although New Jersey is a small state by size, there are over 22,000 individuals working in the major counseling occupational groups.1-5 Counselors in New Jersey enjoy a good range of job opportunities and excellent competitive salaries. The state does require licensure for many counseling professions, which can include specific educational, work experience, and examination requirements. If you are interested in a counseling career in the Garden State, you will learn about many licensure processes and the projected job market prospects by reading the guide below.

Table of Contents
How to Become a Counselor in New Jersey
Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) Licensing Process
Additional Counseling Careers and Licenses in New Jersey
Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)
School Counselor
Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC)
Other Professional Counseling Careers
New Jersey Counseling Career and Salary Information
Counseling Associations in New Jersey
Frequently Asked Questions

How to Become a Counselor in New Jersey

New Jersey requires licensure with the state and a master’s degree to provide most types of professional counseling services. In some cases, applicants will also need to pass required exams and accumulate supervised experience.

1. Decide on an area of counseling.

Due to the various types of New Jersey counseling licensure, your path to licensure may need to be planned out many years in advance. Learning about the different types of licensure and which one may be a good fit for you is an important first step in this journey.

2. Earn the required degree for your preferred counseling area.

You will need at least a master’s degree to obtain most types of New Jersey counseling licensure. For Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) licensure, you will need a master’s degree with at least 45 credits in core counseling areas. You may also want to consider that completing a longer graduate program may shorten the supervised work requirements for this type of licensure. For marriage and family therapy licensure, you will need a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy or a related field. For school counseling licensure, you must have a master’s degree that meets certain coursework requirements in school counseling. Two types of substance abuse counseling licensure are available, one which requires at least a high school diploma and another requiring a master’s degree with counseling or substance abuse content.

3. Get licensed to practice counseling in New Jersey.

Many common types of New Jersey counseling licensure are issued by the State Board of Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy and its various sub-committees. While marriage and family therapists are licensed directly by the Board, professional counselors are licensed by the Board’s Licensed Professional Counselors Committee and substance abuse counselors are licensed by the Board’s Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee. School counselors are licensed through a distinctly separate process via the New Jersey Department of Education. To learn more about the steps to licensure in each of these categories, continue reading below.

Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) Licensing Process

To work as a professional counselor in New Jersey, you must have a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) license issued by the Licensed Professional Counselors Committee, a sub-committee of the State Board of Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy Examiners. New Jersey LPCs assess individuals and groups, provide counseling and psychotherapy services, conduct consultations, and provide referrals to help clients make meaningful mental, emotional, and behavioral changes in their lives. For more about a career in professional counseling, read our mental health counselor career guide. The minimum education requirement in New Jersey is a regionally-accredited master’s degree with at least 45 of 60 credits in specified counseling areas. The Committee does not provide a list of approved programs but the coursework requirements can be found in the Committee regulations.

1. Register as a Licensed Associate Counselor (LAC) and request permission to test.

Obtaining a Licensed Associate Counselor (LAC) license is the first step towards becoming a professional counselor in New Jersey. LACs provide assessment, counseling, and referral services under the supervision of a qualified supervisor. The application form is available online and, as of August 2019, the application fee is $75. The Committee also charges a licensing fee, which will vary depending on when you submit your application. More information can be found on the Committee website.

2. Pass the National Counselor Examination (NCE).

The Committee requires applicants to pass the NBCC National Counselor Exam (NCE). Some applicants may have already passed the NCE as part of their graduate degree requirements. If you have already passed the exam, you do not need to take it again. If you have not taken the exam, you will be issued permission by the Board at this stage. Exam preparation materials can be found on the NBCC website.

3. Accrue supervised experience.

The amount of required supervised experience necessary will depend on your graduate education. If you have only completed the required 60 credits, you will need to complete 4,500 hours of approved supervised work experience. If you have completed 30 additional credits in counseling, for a total of at least 90 credits, you will need to complete 3,000 hours of post-degree supervised experience. Approved supervisors must have an Approved Clinical Supervisor (ACS) certificate or have taken three credits of graduate learning in clinical supervision. Before beginning supervised work experience, the supervisor must submit a Plan of Supervision form to the Committee that outlines the proposed setting, LAC job description, and supervisory credentials.

4. Apply for LPC licensure.

The application form for LPC licensure is available online. As of August 2019, the fee is $75 to apply plus licensure fees that vary based on when you apply. Documents that may have been submitted as part of the LAC application process, such as transcripts, do not need to be re-sent at this stage. Applications must be notarized before they are submitted to the Committee.

5. Complete security checks and receive your license.

The Committee advises that the longest stage of the licensure process can be applying for fingerprint and background checks. Instructions on how to complete these checks are mailed to applicants once their initial applications have been reviewed and approved. Your license will not be issued until the security checks are completed. Once you have passed the security checks, your license will be mailed to you by the Committee. You can only begin to identify yourself and work as an LPC once you receive your license.

Professional Counselor Licensure by Reciprocity in New Jersey

New Jersey offers licensure by reciprocity to candidates who meet New Jersey counseling licensure standards in graduate education, work experience, and exam scores. Applicants use the general LPC application form, checking the “Licensure by Reciprocity” option and including a current resume. The licensing body in the state where you are already licensed will need to send a verification form that includes proof of exam scores and supervised experience and your graduate institution will need to send official transcripts. As of August 2019, the fee is $75 plus applicable licensing fees that may vary.

Counselor Licensing Renewal and Continuing Education Information

LAC and LPC licenses expire on November 30 of even-numbered years. The Committee mails notifications to renew 60 days before the deadline, but it is the licensee’s responsibility to ensure the renewal is completed on time. Renewals can be completed online by following the instructions sent by the Committee. Excluding the first renewal cycle, licensees must complete 40 continuing education hours each renewal period, including five hours in ethics and three hours in social and cultural competency. Continuing education hours can be completed online if desired and up to 10 hours can be carried over to the next renewal period. A list of approved CEU providers can be found in the Committee’s Administrative Code.

Additional Counseling Careers and Licenses in New Jersey

There are several other types of professional counseling that have different pathways to licensure. Below you will find more information about some of these other common types of New Jersey counseling licensure: licensed marriage and family therapists, school counselors, and substance abuse counselors.

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)

Marriage and family therapists in New Jersey are licensed by the State Board of Marriage and Family Therapy Examiners. New Jersey considers marriage and family therapy to be a specialized area of therapy and allows LMFTs to provide counseling and psychotherapy to individuals, couples, and groups in areas such as premarital counseling, pre- and post-divorce counseling, and family therapy. Prospective applicants must be at least 21 years old, of good moral character, and have a graduate degree in marriage and family therapy or a related field. The LMFT licensure process requires applicants to:

  • Register as an Associate Marriage and Family Therapist (AMFT).
  • Complete the required internship.
  • Apply for LMFT licensure and permission to take the national exam for MFTs.
  • Complete fingerprint and background checks.
  • Receive your license.

Keep planning your career as a licensed marriage and family therapist by reading our LMFT career guide.

School Counselor

School counselors in New Jersey enjoy a wide scope of practice that includes assisting students with academic issues and providing counseling services to school staff, students, and parents related to academic, social, and personal issues. Licensure is handled by the New Jersey Department of Education (DOE) as part of the Educational Services Personnel program. To be eligible, applicants must have a master’s degree with coursework in specified areas, such as counseling theory, psychology, and statistics. Programs should be accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) or meet similar standards. The program must also include at least six credits of supervised counseling practicum completed in a school. No exams are required for certification. The steps to school counseling licensure in New Jersey are as follows:

  • Complete an appropriate master’s degree program.
  • Submit a paper application package to the DOE, including transcripts and proof of program completion.
  • Receive your certificate online.

For more information about school counselor careers, review our school counseling career guide.

Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC)

To work as a substance abuse counselor in New Jersey, you must obtain a license from the Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee, which is a sub-committee of New Jersey’s State Board of Marriage and Family Therapy Examiners. Licenses are available for Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC) and Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). The minimum requirement for the LCADC license is a master’s degree with at least 18 credits in counseling or substance abuse, while the CADC only requires a high school diploma. Both are allowed to provide services in 12 core areas, including screening, counseling, and consultation; however, only LCADCs may provide clinical and diagnostic services and CADCs must always work under the supervision of an approved supervisor. To become an LCADC, follow these steps:

  • Complete the required supervised work experience and additional training.
  • Apply for licensure.
  • Pass written and oral IC&RC exams.
  • Complete fingerprint and background checks.
  • Receive your license.

Other Substance Abuse Counseling Credentials Offered in New Jersey

  • Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor (AADC)
  • Associate Prevention Specialist (APS)
  • Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS)
  • Certified Recovery Support Practitioner (CRSP)
  • Certified Peer Recovery Specialist (CPRS)
  • Certified Prevention Specialist (CPS)
  • Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist (CTTS)
  • Chemical Dependence Associate (CDA)

More details about substance abuse counselor careers can be found in our substance abuse counseling career guide.

Other Professional Counseling Careers

A career in counseling can also include working with other populations or working in other settings. In addition to the careers above, you may also be interested in the following professional counseling pathways:

  • Rehabilitation Counselor
  • Gambling Counselor
  • Genetic Counselor
  • Youth Counselor
  • Guidance Counselor
  • Pastoral Counselor
  • Recreational Therapist

New Jersey Counseling Career and Salary Information

New Jersey offers excellent opportunities and salaries for prospective counselors. There are currently 22,080 counselors working across many areas of counseling, with almost 75% working as substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors (8,600) or educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors (7,090).1,3 Counselors in New Jersey report high salaries in many areas of specialization. New Jersey is the top paying state in the country for rehabilitation counselors ($65,350) and counselors, all others ($62,860).4,5 It is also the second-highest paying state for educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors ($72,050), the fourth-highest paying state for marriage and family therapists ($72,380), and the fifth-highest paying state for substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors ($58,410).3,2,1,

Salaries are also comparatively high in metropolitan areas. The state capital of Trenton ranks third in the country for counselors, all other salaries ($84,680), fifth for rehabilitation counselor salaries ($61,180), and sixth for marriage and family therapist salaries ($75,500).5,4,2 Atlantic City-Hammonton ranks eighth among educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors salaries ($78,690) and tenth among marriage and family therapist salaries ($69,780).3,2 Ocean City ranks fourth for educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselor salaries ($81,480).3 Finally, Vineland-Bridgeton area is the ninth highest paying metropolitan area in the country ($62,120) among substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors.1

New Jersey is expected to see minimal to modest growth among counselor positions through 2026. The fastest growth is expected for counselors, all other (11.7%) and rehabilitation counselors (10.4%), though projections for some categories are not available.6 The highest number of new positions is projected for educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors (530).6

OccupationNumber EmployedAverage Annual Salary
Counselors, All Other1,320$62,860
Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors7,090$72,050
Marriage and Family Therapists4,150$72,380
Rehabilitation Counselors920$65,350
Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors8,600$58,410

Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.1-5

Counseling Associations in New Jersey

Frequently Asked Questions

Are there counseling careers without a degree in New Jersey?

Most professional counseling licenses in New Jersey require at least a master’s degree with the exception of the Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) license. This license requires a minimum of a high school diploma but does require applicants to complete substantial additional work experience and training requirements.

What is the difference between LPC and LMFT licensure in New Jersey?

LPC and LMFT licensure allow counselors to provide different services. While both groups can provide services to individuals, LMFTs are more likely to also work with couples, groups, and families. New Jersey considers marriage and family therapy to be a specialized area of therapy dealing with specific life stages, such as premarital counseling, pre- and post-divorce counseling, and family crises. LPCs will likely encounter a more diverse range of client issues.

Does New Jersey offer professional counseling licensure by reciprocity?

Yes, New Jersey offers LPC counseling licensure by reciprocity to applicants who are licensed in other states and who meet the New Jersey counseling licensure requirements set forth by the Committee. To apply for licensure by reciprocity, you will need to provide verification of your existing license directly from the other state, proof of your education and work experience, and your exam scores. As of August 2019, the application fee is $75 plus additional licensure costs that may vary.

Why are there two types of substance abuse counseling licensure in New Jersey?

The two types of New Jersey counseling licensure for substance abuse are Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) and Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC). To become a CADC, you only need a high school diploma, associate’s degree, or bachelor’s degree. For the LCADC, you need a master’s degree with at least 18 credits in counseling or substance abuse. CADCs and LCADCs can perform many of the same functions, but LCADCs are afforded clinical and diagnostic abilities. Additionally, LCADCs can work independently and towards supervisory privileges while CADCs must always work under approved supervision.

What salary can I earn as a counselor in New Jersey?

Reported salaries among counselors in New Jersey are high compared to national averages. The lowest reported average salary is for substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors ($58,410); however, this is well above the national average of $47,920.1 Marriage and family therapists report the highest average salary ($72,380), which is well above the national average ($54,150).2 Salaries are also comparatively high for educational, guidance, school, and vocational counselors ($72,050) compared to the national average ($60,160), making New Jersey the second highest paying state in the country in this category.3

References:
1. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211018.htm
2. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Marriage and Family Therapists: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211013.htm
3. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Educational, Guidance, School, and Vocational Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211012.htm
4. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Rehabilitation Counselors: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211015.htm
5. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wages, Counselors, All Other: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes211019.htm
6. Projections Central, Long Term Occupational Projections 2016-2026: https://projectionscentral.com/Projections/LongTerm